Transforming Norwood

uphamTransforming Norwood: Architect William G. Upham’s Contribution to Early 20th Century Norwood
By Heather S. Cole
CreateSpace, 2012

William G. Upham (1880-1966) was a Harvard-educated architect who designed or renovated more than 50 public and private buildings throughout New England between 1911 and 1954, gaining recognition as a designer of Colonial, Georgian and Gothic Revival buildings. A Norwood, Massachusetts native and resident, Upham designed some of the most important and prominent buildings in town—including the town hall, post office, theatre and high school—many which remain standing today. Upham’s work in town was contemporary with that of Norwood’s first town planner, George F. Willett, and landscape architect Arthur A. Shurtleff (a protégé of Frederick Law Olmsted), and the work of the three men led the transformation of Norwood from a rather haphazardly developed farming village-turned-industrial city into what Willett later described as a “model New England town.

Available from the Norwood Historical Society or on Amazon.com.

 

Remembering Norwood

Remembering NorwoodRemembering Norwood: Win Everett’s Tales of Tyot
Edited by Heather S. Cole and Edward J. Sweeney
The History Press, 2008

Long ago, when Norwood was only virgin forests and streams, the Neponset Indian tribe christened the region ‘Tyot’ a place of waters. The name lingered on the tongues of residents long after their home was renamed and the advent of railroads opened up the region once enclosed by rivers and lakes. As rugged farmhouses dotted the plains and Puritan spires rose above the trees, the sleepy ‘Tyot’ blossomed into the bustling community of Norwood. Decades later, journalist Win Everett preserved Norwood’s colorful history in his column ‘Tales of Tyot’. With stories of haunted taverns and superstitious soldiers, influenza and the industrial age, Everett profiles the fascinating people who left their marks on the pages of Norwood history. Available for the first time in a single volume, these articles bring three centuries of history to life through the artful voice of Norwood’s beloved storyteller.

Available from the Norwood Historical Society or on Amazon.com.

Images of South Norwood

southnorwoodImages of America: South Norwood
By Patricia J. Fanning and Heather S. Cole
Arcadia Publishing, 2004

Beginning in the late nineteenth century, immigrants streamed into Norwood, attracted by work at industrial sites such as Morrill Ink Works, Norwood Press, and Bird & Sons. Arriving from Lithuania, Poland, Syria, and Italy, they took up residence in the southernmost section of town, nicknamed “the Flats.” Facing prejudice and isolation from the more established community, the area became a self-contained neighborhood characterized by small businesses, ethnic cooperative markets, benevolent associations, and the St. George, St. Peter’s, and St. George Orthodox parishes. Today, the immigrant population still thrives, and generations of families keep this melting pot alive with fairs, festivals, and neighbors who truly care about one another.
Available from the Norwood Historical Society.